Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern says 'San Kyu' to Japan

Over the weekend New Zealand continued to say ‘San Kyu’ to the people of Japan through the ‘New Zealand Says 39 Festival’ in Tokyo.

Over the weekend New Zealand continued to say ‘San Kyu’ to the people of Japan through the ‘New Zealand Says 39 Festival’ in Tokyo.
 
Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and former All Blacks captain Richie McCaw opened the event on Saturday, 21 September ahead of the All Blacks opening match with South Africa. The crowd was treated to New Zealand’s contemporary and traditional culture including food, wine, cultural performances and music.
 
Visitors were able to sample New Zealand food such as premium lamb chops, pies and beer, cheese boards and wine, ice-cream, cookies and kiwifruit smoothies. The crowd was wowed by performances from an award winning kapa haka performance group from Te Puia in New Zealand.
 
The following day current All Black squad members Joe Moody, Jack Goodhue, Jordie Barrett, George Bridge, Shannon Frizell and Brad Weber delighted the fans with a fun live calligraphy session.
 
The ‘New Zealand Says 39 Festival’ will pop up again on 5 - 6 October at Aoyama Famers Market, Tokyo
before one final event on 12 - 13 October at Kashiwa no ha, Chiba.
 
The campaign highlights the shared passion and pride in hospitality towards others by recognising Japan’s ‘omotenashi’ with a showcase of gifts, appreciation and manaakitanga from New Zealand’s own culture.
 
On display at all the events will be Te Haeata Whero (Kūwaha) and Te Kopu Whānui (The Mauri Stone).
 
The mauri stone has been gifted by Ngāti Hikairo ki Rotoaira, a Māori tribe from New Zealand’s central North Island region. The mauri stone is seen as a conduit for the earth’s energy; the stone channels the energy that derives from the natural world – a world composed of inter-related deities. Japanese people – and visitors from around the world to Japan – can touch the stone and feel the energy and connection to New Zealand
 
Te Haeata Whero is a kūwaha – a bespoke carving and a symbolic doorway – that offers a threshold celebrating cultures, beliefs and identities, and an acknowledgment of the connection between Japan and New Zealand.
 
Te Haeata Whero was conceptually designed by Karl Johnstone (Haumi NZ Ltd.), Te Ngaehe Wanikau (Ngāti Hīkairo) and Master Carver James Rickard from the New Zealand Māori Arts and Crafts Institute (NZMACI).
 
Event Saturday Sept 21:

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Event Sunday Sept 22:

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