Rotorua, where Māori culture thrives in an otherworldly geothermal landscape, is a cultural treasure bubbling with history, stories and outdoor adventures.

Rotorua
 
Since the early 19th century, tourists have flocked to Rotorua’s natural hot springs, bubbling mud pools and active geysers – all of them spectacular thermal wonders on the "Pacific ring of fire". 
 
Māori culture and history infuse Rotorua life. The city, on the shores of Lake Rotorua, is home to Te Arawa iwi, one of New Zealand’s largest Māori tribes. A third of Rotorua's population is Māori.
 
The name Rotorua translates as "second lake". It is one of 18 sparkling lakes, each surrounded by magnificent native and exotic forests.
 
This mystical volcanic landscape provides a dynamic backdrop to many adventures – mountain biking, trout fishing, bathing in natural hot pools, whitewater rafting and many other of the adventures New Zealand is famous for.  
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